Hand full

Once a baby Girl went to a shop with her mother. The shop keeper looked at the small cute child and showed her a bottle with sweets…


And said, “Dear Child, you can take the sweets”.
But the child didn’t take. The shopkeeper was surprised Such a small child she is and why is she not taking the sweets from the bottle.
Again he said take the sweets. Now the mother also heard that and said, “Take the sweets dear”.
Yet she didn’t take it. The shopkeeper seeing the child not taking the sweets. He himself took the sweets and gave to the child. The child was happy to get two hands full of sweets. While returning home the Mother asked the child Why didn’t you take the sweets, when the shop keeper told you to take..?
Can you guess the response:
Child replies Mom! My hands are very small and if I take the sweets I can only take few.. But now you see when uncle gave with his big hands, How many more sweets I got! 😀

MORAL LESSON:
When we take we may get little but when Our Father in Heaven gives He gives us more beyond our expectations more than what we can think of Because His blessings are more better than we can even imagine 🙂 
Always ask God what you want and wait for the Lord to give you more!!

“जिसने मुझको प्यासा रक्खा बनी रहे वह भी हाला,
जिसने जीवन भर दौड़ाया बना रहे वह भी प्याला,
मतवालों की जिहवा से हैं कभी निकलते शाप नहीं,
दुखी बनाया जिसने मुझको सुखी रहे वह मधुशाला”

Answers to my Questions

I asked God to omit my problems.
His answer: No…, it’s not for eliminated but to defeated.
 
I asked God to heal my disability
His answer: No…, your soul is perfect but the body is just temporary.
 
I asked God to give me patience
His answer: No…, patience is the result of trouble not for given but to be learned.
 
I asked God to give me blessing
His answer: No…, I give thankfulness to you so your life will never be lacked.
 
I ask God to keep me away from suffering
His answer: No…, suffer will keeping you away from worldly attention and bring you closer to me.
 
I asked God to grow my faith
His answer: No…, it must grow itself but I will prune for you to quickly bear the fruit.
 
I ask God to give me everything so I could enjoy life
His answer: No…, I give life for you to enjoy everything.
 
I ask God to help me love others as He loves me.
Then He said: “Hmm…,, finally you understand”

***

Utterly loved

i have no idea how it feels to be utterly loved.
i am the place a person falls.
to when life gets hard.
i am the shoulder, the keeper of secrets, 
the kindness through their pain.
i am the wisdom,the knowledge the prophet when everything goes wrong.
i have no idea how it feels to be utterly loved.

In the same Attire

Wu Conghan, 101 years old, and his 103-year-old wife pose for photos while wearing wedding clothes at their home in a village of Nanchong

Wu Conghan, 101 years old, and his 103-year-old wife pose for photos while wearing wedding clothes at their home in a village of Nanchong, Sichuan province, November 5, 2012. The couple had their first photo taken in wedding suit and dress after being married for 88 years.

*Enlightening Act*

People say the hardest part about meditating is finding the time to meditate. This makes sense: who these days has time to do nothing? It’s hard to justify..

Meditation brings many benefits: It refreshes us, helps us settle into what’s happening now, makes us wiser and gentler, helps us cope in a world that overloads us with information and communication, and more. But if you’re still looking for a business case to justify spending time meditating, try this one: Meditation makes you more productive.

How? By increasing your capacity to resist distracting urges.

Research shows that an ability to resist urges will improve your relationships, increase your dependability, and raise your performance. If you can resist your urges, you can make better, more thoughtful decisions. You can be more intentional about what you say and how you say it. You can think about the outcome of your actions before following through on them.

Our ability to resist an impulse determines our success in learning a new behavior or changing an old habit. It’s probably the single most important skill for our growth and development.

As it turns out, that’s one of the things meditation teaches us. It’s also one of the hardest to learn.

When I sat down to meditate this morning, relaxing a little more with each out-breath, I was successful in letting all my concerns drift away. My mind was truly empty of everything that had concerned it before I sat. Everything except the flow of my breath. My body felt blissful and I was at peace.

For about four seconds

Within a breath or two of emptying my mind, thoughts came flooding in —  I felt an itch on my face and wanted to scratch it. A great title for my next picture popped into my head and I wanted to write it down before I forgot it.

 I thought of at least four phone calls I wanted to make and one difficult conversation I was going to have later that day. I became anxious, knowing I only had a few hours of writing time. What was I doing just sitting here? I wanted to open my eyes and look at how much time was left on my countdown timer. I heard my siblings fighting in the other room and wanted to intervene.

Here’s the key though: I wanted to do all those things, but I didn’t do them. Instead, every time I had one of those thoughts, I brought my attention back to my breath.

Meditation teaches us to resist the urge of that counterproductive follow through.

For example, when an employee makes a mistake and you want to yell at him even though you know that it’s better — for him and for the morale of the group — to ask some questions and discuss it gently and rationally. Or when you want to blurt something out in a meeting but know you’d be better off listening. Or when you want to buy or sell a stock based on your emotions when the fundamentals and your research suggest a different action. Or when you want to check email every three minutes instead of focusing on the task at hand.

Meditating daily will strengthen your willpower muscle. Your urges won’t disappear, but you will be better equipped to manage them. And you will have experience that proves to you that the urge is only a suggestion. You are in control.

So how do you do it? If you’re just starting, keep it very simple.

Sit with your back straight enough that your breathing is comfortable — on a chair or a cushion on the floor — and set a timer for however many minutes you want to meditate. Once you start the timer, close your eyes, relax, and don’t move except to breathe, until the timer goes off. Focus on your breath going in and out. Every time you have a thought or an urge, notice it and bring yourself back to your breath.

That’s it. Simple but challenging. Try it — today — for five minutes. And then try it again tomorrow.

Who says meditation is a waste of time?

So if you like the idea of meeting yourself then you can fix an appointment in the morning at 5 or 6 as per your convenience. 😉

Do Try and share the experience 🙂